Uganda 2019 - Part Three

The Nile River runs through Uganda. In fact, its origin is Lake Victoria at Jinga, a town in eastern Uganda. The Nile is about 4,000 miles in length and it takes the water 3 months to flow from Lake Victoria to the Mediterranean Sea.

We crossed the Nile several times, both on land and in the air. We also had the opportunity to see the source at Jinga. We did a short boat tour of the source, and had lunch there. As with some other natural wonders that humans have found, the source of the Nile has been commercialized. While the nature of the shops was rather different, one of the guys in our group likened it to Clifton Hill at Niagara Falls. Nonetheless, it was incredible to see.

Incidentally, one of the guys who was driving us around Uganda is named Moses. So, yes, we were at the Nile River with Moses.

(Click to scroll through the photos below.)

We visited a number of small farmers in Uganda. Their “farms” may be better described as gardens, at least by North American standards. Most of them were no larger than an acre, but they worked hard to produce various crops. We saw farmers growing tomatoes, eggplant, onions and lots of corn. We met a young man who had planted 1,000 orange trees about six years ago, and was just starting to see the fruits of his labour (no pun intended).

This is some of the equipment that the co-op had purchased.

This is some of the equipment that the co-op had purchased.

We also met a small group of farmers who had joined forces to form a co-op. This allowed them to negotiate better prices for their crops, and they also jointly purchased some equipment that allowed them to “add value” to their grain by shelling, grinding and bagging it. Some of the members of our team were able to share some farming advice that would help them increase their yields.

We visited a school sponsored by the Ugandan Pentecostal church. We were there during one of their weekly outdoor assemblies (first photo below). I was impressed by the respect and attentiveness of the large group of teens.

We also saw one of their dormitories (second photo below). So many students living in a cramped area. Nothing like the dorms in Canadian schools! Their classrooms were quite basic, but did the job (Photos 3 and 4). They had black boards, but definitely no Smart Boards!

On Sunday, we were able to visit Watoto Church. A wonderful, highly energetic time of worship. Some of you may have seen the Watoto Children’s Choir perform. The Choir originated at Watoto Church, which incidentally was founded by a Canadian couple.

Interestingly, we were given a plastic parking pass when we pulled into the parking lot. We were not allowed to leave the parking lot without returning the pass. This didn’t make a lot of sense to me (since we didn’t display the pass on the dashboard or anything). But it was explained to us that the system was in place to prevent vehicle thefts. The vehicle owner takes the pass into church with them, then if anyone tries to steal their vehicle while they are in church, the thief can’t get out of the parking lot (since they don’t have a pass).

I’ll leave you with a fun picture we took one evening. In Canada, if you want to move some furniture, you’d need to own an pickup or find a friend with a trailer. Not so in Uganda. You just tie it to the back of your motorcycle.

Yes, that’s a love seat and a chair on the back of that motorcycle. We didn't get a photo of it, but one day we saw someone carrying a full-size couch on their motorcycle.

Yes, that’s a love seat and a chair on the back of that motorcycle. We didn't get a photo of it, but one day we saw someone carrying a full-size couch on their motorcycle.

Thanks for following along on my Ugandan adventure. If you have any questions or thoughts, feel free to comment below.

David Dawson2 Comments